NOV
7

NSCA Renewal Deadline Approaches

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Our last extended article for CSCSs and CPTs was published all the way back in January and began with the opener, “[t]hink it’s too soon to start thinking about to start thinking about December 31st? Think again!” Now here we are all the way in November, and just shy of two months away from your renewal deadline. If you doubted it before, then now we can officially say that it isn’t too soon to start thinking about your yearend deadline, and the CE requirements that go along with it.

By now you probably know how many hours you need to meet the continuing education aspect of the license renewal process, but just in case you need a little refresher (who doesn’t from time to time?) the number of hours you need is dependent on the date of certification. If you earned your certification prior to 2012, your required to complete 6.0 CEUs or 60 hours; if you became certified during 2012, you're required to complete 4.0 CEUs or 40 hours; and if you’ve recently become certified (between January 1, 2014 through June 30, 2014), then you're required to complete 1.0 CEUs or 10 hours of continuing education. If you earned your certification after June 30, 2014, then you are not required to complete any CEUs this year, and your biennial renewal period will begin after December 31, 2014.

There’s more than one way to complete your CE requirement. You can opt to retake the certification exam and knock out the requirement with one test, or you can opt for continuing education units like those offered at Milestone. If you’ve chosen to go the CEU route of completion, then your date of licensure will determine how many hours out of the four categories you’ll need to complete in order to qualify for renewal. For example, if you were certified before 2012, then you can only complete 3.5 CEUs (or 35 hours) from Category D, which includes home study courses.

Always be sure to keep up with the source of this information, the NSCA Website, to review their handy Continuing Education Pamphlet that will provide you with the specifics of each category's approved activities and limitations. Once you’ve chosen which two of the four CE categories you’re going to complete, then you can get started. If you’ve chosen Category D among your options, then that’s where Milestone comes in!

NSCA Approved Continuing Education CoursesMilestone Continuing Education is an NSCA Approved Provider (L1272) and CSCSs and NSCA CPTs can expect high quality downloadable content based on relevant topics that will enhance professional knowledge and improve impact with their clients. Designed to fit into your life seamlessly, without the travel, hotel, or conference registration costs. Milestone is also a BOC Approved Provider (P8382), so duly certified CSCS and CPTs can obtain CE titles with one easy purchase.

Learn more about Milestone on our website or contact one of our friendly CE Specialists at 1-800-709-8820. For all the specifics on you renewal process, visit the National Strength & Conditioning Association website.



NOV
3

November CE Deadline Roundup

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The month of November isn't a popular one for state deadlines, but it is for birthday and license based renewal regulations. Or if you are a LMT working in New Jersey! So maybe a more accurate title for this blog post would be "Massage Therapy CE (New Jersey Edition)" and with that, the series will go on!

The board requires licensees to complete 20 hours continuing education, including 2 hours of ethics, by November 30th. In order to complete the renewal requirement successfully, the CE courses must focus on topics directly related to the practice of massage therapy. The board excludes any subject matter related to the administrative or business practices related to the profession. Milestone CE courses are created from the most current technical information available in the field, and board's content requirements. Choose from titles like:

NCBTMB Approved Continuing Education for Massage Therapists



The board regulations do not ask licensees to send in their certificates of completion at the end of each biennial renewal period. Instead, the board conducts random audits. It might seem scary, but never fear! When you purchase your CEUs from Milestone, your certificates of completion are permanently stored in your private account as PDF documents that can be printed or e-mailed with ease. Additionally, Milestone is an approved continuing education provider by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (), a national organization recognized by the New Jersey MT board.

With just under a month to go, now is the perfect time to get started on your CE requirement with Milestone Continuing Education. Simply purchase, download, and go!

OCT
30

LMTs: More Than Just Magic Hands

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Occasionally the general public may lose sight of all of the wonderful health and wellness benefits massage therapy can offer. Using easily accessible and inexpensive tools, like social media, offers people the ability to learn more about the specialized education and training licensed massage therapists go through (and maintain with CE courses), as well as the variety of health problems treated and prevented by these skilled professionals. Bolstering general knowledge about the profession makes commitment to a plan of therapy much more appealing once there is a better understanding of the benefits.

For instance, many people might think massage therapy is simply an endeavor in luxury. But as a trained professional, you know that a major focal point of the profession is preventative and restorative treatment. Using your marketing platforms (social media, brochures, e-mails, etc.) to educate potential clients about this aspect of your services will send the message that they don't have to wait until their birthday or a special occasion to enjoy the benefits of regularly scheduled visits with a massage therapy. In addition to restorative treatments, advertising preventative treatment plans on social media offers people a glimpse of how well-rounded massage therapy services are, and provides the opportunity for repeat business and referrals because of the user-friendly nature of these online tools.

Social media sites are amazing (and free!) tools that offer the potential to reach many prospective clients. In conjunction with traditional forms of connecting (like business cards, fact sheets, brochures and mailers), use platforms like Facebook, Google+, and Twitter to connect with the community your practice serves. This gives people who are curious about your services an opportunity to feel connected with your practice before they ever walk through the door. Don't forget to consider popular discount websites like Goupon.com, or venture offline with printed ads packages like Valpak, which can reach thousands of people in the area surrounding your business. Have your business cards and brochures with information about your website, contact information, and your educational information proudly displayed within arm's reach when they walk in for their first appointment, and you've already made an excellent impression.

In addition to creating social media profiles and connecting that way, utilize template-based e-mail blast websites like MadMiMi.com or ConstantContact.com to easily generate e-mails. These websites are inexpensive and are truly user-friendly, and can be an invaluable marketing tool for your practice. Using them to generate newsletters, special offer announcements and holiday oriented discounts gets your practice's information into potential patient inboxes where it can be easily accessed and (even better) forwarded to more potential patients.

If reaching potential patients via online means is not for you, educate and market to your community with mailers, brochures, fact sheets, and business cards. As you know, having your business's information displayed at gyms, offices, medical centers, and other relevant public places around your community increases your impression rate and keeps your business in the forefront of potential clients' minds. In addition to printed marketing materials, teaching courses focused on massage therapy educates the community about the health and wellness benefits your services offer, and can also potentially earn you continuing education credits (but be sure to check your state board's continuing education regulations first to review the guidelines for obtaining hours this way).

Many user-friendly, inexpensive, and effective marketing options geared to your budget and time frame are out there. It's up to you to choose which ones will help educate your community about all your business has to offer. Have a helpful marketing suggestion that you didn't see here? Put it in the comments below! And if you want to learn more about online CE options for massage therapists, head over to MilestoneCE.com.


OCT
29

Getting To Know You (DC Edition)

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Online continuing education courses for chiropractorsOccasionally the general public may lose sight of all of the wonderful health and wellness benefits chiropractic medicine can offer. Using easily accessible and inexpensive tools, like social media, offers people the ability to learn more about the specialized education and training chiropractors go through (and maintain with CE courses), as well as the variety of health problems treated and prevented by these skilled healthcare practitioners. Bolstering general knowledge about the profession makes commitment to a plan of therapy much more appealing once there is a better understanding of the benefits. For example...

Many people avoid medical care until there is a problem. But a major focal point of chiropractic healthcare is prevention. Using your marketing platforms (social media, brochures, e-mails, etc.) to educate potential patients about this aspect of your services will send the message that they don't have to wait until they're hurting to enjoy the benefits of regularly scheduled visits with a chiropractor. In addition to restorative treatments, advertising preventative treatment plans on social media offers patients a glimpse of how well-rounded chiropractic services are, and provides the opportunity for repeat business and referrals because of the user-friendly nature of these online tools.

Social media sites are amazing (and free!) tools that offer the potential to reach many prospective patients. In conjunction with traditional forms of connecting (like business cards, fact sheets, brochures and mailers), use platforms like Facebook, Google+, and Twitter to connect with the community your practice serves. This gives potential patients an opportunity to feel connected with your practice before they ever walk through the door. Don't forget to consider popular discount websites like Goupon.com, or venture offline with printed ads packages like Valpak, which can reach thousands of people in the area surrounding your practice. Have your business cards and brochures with information about your website, contact information, and your educational information proudly displayed within arm's reach when they walk in for their first appointment, and you've already made an excellent impression.

In addition to creating social media profiles and connecting that way, utilize template-based e-mail blast websites like MadMiMi.com or ConstantContact.com to easily generate e-mails. These websites are inexpensive and are truly user-friendly, and can be an invaluable marketing tool for your practice. Using them to generate newsletters, special offer announcements and holiday oriented discounts gets your practice's information into potential patient inboxes where it can be easily accessed and (even better) forwarded to more potential patients.

If reaching potential patients via online means is not for you, educate and market to your community with mailers, brochures, fact sheets about your practice, and business cards. As you know, having your practice's information displayed at gyms, senior centers, offices, medical centers, and other relevant public places around your community increases your impression rate and keeps your practice in the forefront of potential patient's minds. In addition to printed marketing materials, teaching courses focused on chiropractic healthcare benefits educates the community about the health and wellness benefits your services offer, and can also potentially earn you chiropractic continuing education credits (but be sure to check your state board's continuing education regulations first to review the guidelines for obtaining hours this way).

Many user-friendly, inexpensive, and effective marketing options geared to your budget and time frame are out there. It's up to you to choose which ones will help educate your community about all your practice has to offer. Have a helpful marketing suggestion for a chiropractic clinic that you didn't see here? Put it in the comments below! And if you want to learn more about online CE options for chiropractors, head over to MilestoneCE.com.

OCT
14

OT Continuing Education (New Mexico Edition)

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NM OT OTA

New Mexico Occupational Therapists and OT Assistants have an approaching CE deadline of September 30th. According to the New Mexico Regulation and Licensing twenty (20) hours of OT continuing education must be completed during the annual renewal period. Practitioners may carry over up to sixteen (16) hours into the next renewal period beginning October 1st. Ten (10) hours may be completed with online CE courses.

As an AOTA Approved Provider (7487), Milestone CE is approved to provide continuing education courses for New Mexico OTs and OTAs. Start preparing to fulfill your annual CE requirement by reviewing our extensive course catalog, featuring over 690 hours of online or mail order courses under categories like: Movement System Impairment Syndromes, Imaging in Rehabilitation, Geriatric Rehabilitation, and Orthopedic Physical Therapy. Additionally, all Milestone CE courses are designed with the most recent information available in your field. You'll never find a stale subject here!

At Milestone CE, we know that the occupational therapy motto is "Living Life to Its Fullest," and we believe that not only includes your patients, but you as well! We also know that completing your OT continuing education requirements take precious time out of your already busy schedule, so we pride ourselves in providing our hardworking OTs and OTAs with affordable, top of the line CEUs that deliver the information and training to hone your practicing skills, and enhance your career. Our continuing education is designed to help OTs and OTAs to:

• Function efficiently in their work environment

• Improve overall knowledge of the latest studies and practice methods in the OT realm

• Develop and hone OT training skills and techniques

• Add to their arsenal of effective therapeutic approaches

Your 20 hours of occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant continuing education requirement will be due before you know it! With the remaining time you have to complete your CEUs, we hope you will consider Milestone your number one source for OT continuing education. Milestone CE is on the way to becoming a top provider of occupational therapy CE in the continuing education industry, and has developed online course work to help you achieve the training goals you need to meet for recertification. At Milestone, you can complete your CE requirement with one easy purchase,, and eliminate the stress and expense of attending occupational therapy seminars!

AOTA Approved Provider

Contact us and talk with our knowledgeable CE Specialists to find out how you can benefit from our courses. To learn more about what it means to be an AOTA Approved provider of occupational therapy continuing education, please visit the American Occupational Therapy Association website.


OCT
10

October CE Deadline Roundup

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We're running a little late on our deadline reviews for the month of October, and just in case you're running a little late purchasing CEU courses for the renewal period, click on your state and it will take you directly to the Course Catalog (or if you don't see your state and profession below, click on the Course Catalog link!). Opt for online CE, select your course titles, and get started immediately with this easy downloadable option. What are you waiting for? Time is ticking away!

Approved Provider LogosPTs: Colorado

OTs: Kentucky, Oklahoma

LMTs: Georgia, Maryland,New Mexico


And of course, we can't forget about those license number or birthday-based deadlines. You know who you are... And if you want to get to know us better, check out our FAQ Section or give us a call at 1-800-709-8820.


SEP
26

Maryland Message Therapy CE

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NCBTMB Massage Therapy Continuing Education CoursesThe Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene updated the continuing education requirements for massage therapists back in January 2014. This post will review those changes and summarize the CE requirements for current and new licensees. For comprehensive rules and regulations for massage therapy continuing education, please visit the Maryland Board website: www.MDmassage.org. If you are a new licensee to the profession (in practice for less than one year), you are exempt for the CE course requirement portion of the renewal process, although you will still be required to complete the other steps related to license renewal outside of getting your CEU credits.

The previously mentioned changes to the continuing education requirements will apply during this upcoming biennial renewal period, ending on October 31, 2014. However, please note that all continuing education courses must be completed no later than October 30th! Licensees who have been in practice for a year or more will be required to complete a total of 24 hours of continuing education which the Board has broken up into the following specifications: 3 hours of ethics and jurisprudence; 3 hours of communicable disease (HIV/AIDS) education; 1 hour from cultural/diversity competency; and the remaining 17 hours from Board-approved CE courses focused on topics related directly to the practice of massage therapy.

Your CE credits can be obtained by attending live seminars or opting for home study and/or online courses. The only limitation related to the format of your CE courses pertains to local, regional or national conferences. Only up to 12 hours can be obtained from those events during the biennial renewal period. Board accepted CE companies are accredited (considered pre-approved by the MD Board) if they are also approved to offer LMT CE courses by organizations like the American Massage Therapy Association, Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation, or the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. If you opt to take CE courses at a state accredited university or college, or receive credit from the U.S. Military Commands, these are also accepted by the Maryland Board and will count toward your overall CE requirement.

Choosing a CE provider can be tricky, even with the long list of accepted pre-approved options. But if you've found your way to this blog post, then you're on the right track! As a NCBTMB Approved Provider (#491), Milestone Continuing Education is the perfect choice for completing your 17 hours of core CE coursework. Currently offering over 85 hours of online CE credits with course titles like "Integrated Sports Massage Therapy" and "Deep Tissue Massage Treatment" among others, our professionally relevant and affordable courses are designed for your convenience and professional development. Choose your courses in mail order format, or for instant access, choose online (PDF) format, download to your tablet device and get started on your requirement immediately after purchase. And don't forget to purchase your course modules in a "Bundle Pack" to save even more! Visit the Course Catalog and get started today!

Have questions? We've got answers! E-mail info@MilestoneCE.com or call 1-800-709-8820 to speak with a friendly CE Specialist today.

SEP
22

Geriatric Occupational Rehabilitation

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Occupational Therapy Geriatric PatientsThe number of older people is increasing daily and OTs need to be ready to treat them. Geriatric rehab patients/clients require a different approach than the younger set. First of all, these people usually do not see the need for occupational therapy because they are retired. They see an occupation as a livelihood””NOT an activity. Therefore, your first step will be to clarify what OT is all about.

Next, you must get the senior to understand why occupational therapy is necessary and how it will benefit him/her. You are “selling” the senior on doing therapy; so act like a salesperson. Customers want to know the WIIFM factor. That is…what’s in it for me?

You’ll need to stress the positive outcomes as well as the negative of what will happen if they don’t do the therapy. “Your life will be a lot harder than it needs to be, if you choose not to do therapy,” always worked for me.

Make it seem as if they are making the choice. It’s similar to dealing with children by saying, “Do you want to wear your blue coat or your red coat?” The bottom line is…the child will be wearing a coat. Offering controlled choices can lead your elderly patient/client into occupational therapy.

As a rehab nurse, it was my job to get patients to do their range of motion exercises each evening. The stretching hurt, so people didn’t want to comply. When I explained it was their choice if they wanted a normal looking limb or not-- they always did their ROMs.

Sometimes geriatric patients/clients think that occupational therapy is a waste of time. I often heard the complaint, “They tried to make me to do things a kindergartner would do!” That was followed by, “I wouldn’t do it.”

If that senior citizen understood that putting pegs into holes on a board would ultimately help him regain the function in his weak arm, he probably would have done it.

Show and Tell

Show the geriatric person the goal and explain how you plan to help them reach it. Some forgetfulness is a natural part of aging. So, writing it down helps to provide a visual reminder of how and when to do the activity, as well as why the person should put in the effort.

Problems, Problems

Focus on your goal--to get the senior to do what you need him/her to do. Meeting that goal will lead the patient/client to improve as much and as fast as possible. Avoid focusing only on the issue you are there to treat. Look at the whole picture.

Normal aging with decreased visual acuity, decreased stamina, forgetfulness, and decreased motor function all need to be taken into account.

Most geriatric people have more than one problem. The senior might have general deterioration from aging as well as some chronic health issues. And now, that senior has another problem that requires OT.

Pain

Say the senior already had arthritis and now has a stroke…that could double the amount of pain that person usually tolerates. Monitor each person carefully to be sure there is adequate pain control. A person in pain is NOT going to do much therapy. Determine the pain source and treat it accordingly. Try ice, heat, massage, manipulation, topical treatments, oral pain medication, or whatever you think will help make your session most effective.

Most patients I treated did not want to take oral pain medicine regularly. They worried about “getting the habit.” It took time and effort to educate them before they understood that taking pain medicine before therapy would help them to function better and get home faster. After they finally understood…they took it because they knew it was in their best interest.

Motivation

Motivation is not a strong skill in the elderly. They complain, “I’m tired and retired. “ Convince the patient/client that it will benefit him or her to do OT.

The geriatric mind set is different from that of younger people. Older people usually worked hard all their lives. They typically want to “follow the rules’ and don’t want to be seen as a “troublemaker.” Use that to your advantage. Explain what you need them to do. Then tell how and why they should do it.

Motivate seniors with constant praise. Also, remind them of the benefits they will earn by working hard. That way you will both be doing your best!

SEP
17

The Circle of Care: Working Together

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PT, OT, AT, CSCS, CPT, MT, DC

While Certified Personal Trainers do design fitness plans and encourage clients to “Drop and give me 20” they also work in concert with a client’s other medical professionals. These professionals may include physicians, chiropractors, physical therapists, massage therapists and athletic trainers. Collaborating in tandem gives a client the most complete circle of care.

If a client is experiencing serious health issues such as heart disease or extreme obesity, Certified Personal Trainers can work with the client’s primary physician to develop programming, avoid contraindicated activity and cooperatively assess the best course of action for the client. Physicians can provide trainers with a complete list of prescribed medications and discuss activities that should be encouraged or avoided.

Clients with postural alignment or impingement issues may have an ongoing relationship with a chiropractor. Throughout their careers, Chiropractors are required to complete PACE approved continuing education courses. Similar to a collaboration with a physician, Certified Personal Trainers and Chiropractors can work together to design a program that complements (rather than impedes) the chiropractic plan.

Massage Therapists specialize in relieving muscle tension and alleviating discomfort. A client may have a predisposition for a posture or behavior that causes tight muscles. Certified Personal trainers and Massage Therapists can join forces to provide an even higher level of care for the client. Trainers can integrate corrective exercises into the workout program and massage therapists can concentrate on keeping muscles loose.

Post injury or surgery, rehabilitation or physical therapy is usually necessary. Out of all the collaborations discussed, this is possibly the most critical. Physical therapists will design a comprehensive recovery plan for their patient and Certified Personal Trainers must intimately understand that program in order to further the progress rather than hinder it. The nature of the recovery will dictate how much exercise as well as what type of exercise is permissible. A complete training program will include all major muscle groups but based on the client’s issues and current physical therapy plan, the trainer may need to skip certain muscle groups. Once physical therapy is finished, the personal trainer may implement therapy-specific exercises or stretches into the training program to further benefit the client.

Guided by physicians, athletic trainers work with a large variety of clients in hospitals, schools and industrial environments. Serving as an intermediary between a physician and physical therapist, athletic trainers administer medicine/first aid, conduct injury appraisals and teach preventative care. Athletic trainers must complete continuing education courses in order to stay current in their fields. Often, athletic trainers work with sports teams to provide on-site care, assessments and nutritional direction. Athletic trainers and Certified Personal Trainers can team up to either integrate sport-specific exercises into a training program or avoid over-training of specific muscles.

Clearly, cooperative medical relationships can significantly elevate the level of client care. However, do not initiate medical relationships without the consent of the client and a signed Release of Information form. The Release of Information form protects you in the event the client decides to pursue legal action.

SEP
10

Motivating Your Clients

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Motivating Clients for Physical Therapists and Occupational Therapists

You will never get people to reach their potential until they are motivated to do so. Everyone knows that motivation has peaks and valleys. However, it is your responsibility to stimulate motivation in patients/clients, so they can reach their desired goal.

The main way to do this is to ASK each patient/client what goal he (or she) has in mind. Then explain exactly how that goal can be reached.

Patients/clients who have suffered a life changing injury, may have to go through the stages of grief before accepting a hard fact…such as they will never walk again. If the goal is totally unreasonable, tactfully direct the person to a realistic goal. For example: if a person with a severed spinal cord says, “My goal is to walk my daughter down the aisle at her wedding next month.” I suggest you tactfully tell him that it is not a realistic goal. But offer an option that IS doable. Something like, “Let’s concentrate on building up your strength so you will be able to attend the wedding and the reception.”

Remember what the patient/client wants and make sure goals meet the SMART criteria. A SMART goal is:

  • Specific
  • Measurable (you will be able to walk X number of feet)
  • Attainable
  • Realistic
  • Timed (by July you will be…)


Written goals are more concrete; they motivate people. The person can see exactly where he (or she) is going. I’ve had success motivating people by telling stories or showing them pictures of other s who have overcome the same obstacles…or worse. It is hard for a person to wallow in self- pity because of an arm injury after hearing about a soldier who lost both of his arms in an active combat scenario. And when they learn that the ex-soldier now shovels the snow off his walk…it blows away excuses for NOT doing more. A person can hardly feel sorry for himself after hearing something like that. The person learns that no one is hopeless.


One patient became despondent after his leg was mangled. He wasn’t even trying to improve. I brought in a journal article that included a before and after picture of someone who had an even worse injury. He said, “You mean my leg can actually look almost normal and move again?” Whenever a person learns that something is possible, he (or she) is more likely to work towards a goal that seemed impossible before.

When I worked in one Rehabilitation Hospital, most of my patients were quadriplegics, paraplegics, and hemiplegics. The doctors and therapists asked our “old” patients to come back to talk to the newly traumatized ones. It gave encouragement to the newly injured. The newbies asked the “old pros” things they would never ask a professional. Issues like: catheters, bowel function, and sex were discussed candidly. Seeing people who were working, going to college, dating, and raising families while in a wheelchair, inspired them. It motivated them to do more than they had been doing. It gave them new hope. Even if life would never be “normal” again…they understood that life was still worth living. Eventually, they developed a new normal.

That’s where you come in. Show the patients/ clients what their new normal will look like. Then show them how to achieve it. Motivate people by showing them what they will get from all their hard work. Nothing is more frustrating than failing at something when you are trying your best. Yet that is exactly what happens when someone is recovering. So encourage people to keep trying. Be sure to break the goals down into manageable tasks and praise all efforts. It will be your job to routinely review the goals and the progress. Remind people they can reach their goals IF they continue to work at it. Then do your best to keep your patient/client moving forward.